Planting vegetable gardens

Planting vegetable gardens

Planting vegetable gardens can be a very rewarding endeavor, not to mention that it’s good for your body because of all the exercise you will get, and the vegetables that you’ll get to eat.

These days, it’s really ideal if you can plant your own vegetables to make sure that they’re pesticide free, but a lot of people feel intimidated by the idea of planting vegetable gardens especially in a city.

Before choosing a layout you need to decide on what type of vegetable you would like to grow and where you would like to plant them.

Here are other factors you need to consider for your garden layout: Garden Space, Amount of Light in the Space, Drainage System, Soil Amendments, Type of Vegetable and Additional Space (if needed).

Planting Styles The more traditional way of planting vegetables is laying them out in straight, organized lines.

Some people prefer to plant alternating rows of different types of vegetables so that when one type of vegetable is about to be harvested, the rows in between them have vegetables that are not yet in season.

The soil structure quickly becomes ruined because gardeners have to walk between rows, though.

A great way to work out: If you got little or no time to go to the gym or health spa to work out, then let gardening provide your daily dose of exercise.

Tending your vegetable garden for at least 30 minutes a day is a great way to burn those excess calories and lose weight. You are able to work several major muscle groups in the body, like the legs, arms, back, buttocks and many others.

Gardening is also improves your flexibility each time you stretch to reach for weeds or bend to plant a seedling.

Consider Companion Planting: The idea behind companion planting involves planting different kinds of plants together so that they help each other grow.

A perfect example of this is planting beans, corn and squash together which were commonly done by Native Americans.

While the corn gives the beans a place to climb, the beans gives its three companions nutrients in the soil and the squash serves as a shade to the roots of the plants beside it. This not only prevents weeds from growing, it also saves up on water.

Help save the environment: If commercially grown vegetables receive little demand from consumers, then commercial farmers will find no reason to expand their plantations.

So there’s no need to cut down rain forests and devastate habitats of wild animals. Also, if demand is lowered farmers will use less pesticide and other harmful chemicals that pollute our rivers and the rest of the environment.

You might feel that you as a concerned citizen cannot contribute that much positive impact on the environment by planting vegetable gardens.

But imagine the difference made if a lot of people started to plant their vegetables in their own backyard.